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Wills, Trusts, and Estates Archives

A Map to the Probate Process Without a Will in Ohio

Life does not have a predetermined expiration date. When a loved one dies unexpectedly and without a will, the grief of those remaining face is compounded by having to deal with the probate process without a will in Ohio. When happens, the surviving family and friends need to know how to settle the estate without the guidance provided by a will.

Need to Know How to Modify an Ohio Will?

If you have ever written a will, perhaps you remember thinking as you wrote it that it was truly your "last" will and testament, to be stored away and not retrieved until your death. Times change, however, and so do people, relationships, and feelings; oftentimes, this requires that you revisit your will to make sure it reflects your wishes. If you feel that a change is required for your own will, or perhaps for the will of a loved one, knowing how to modify an Ohio will requires a bit of investigation. When you need to modify a will in Ohio, you should consider several matters to ensure that your modified last will and testament carries out your intentions.

How Do I Go Through Probate in Ohio?

Death creates a void in the lives of the family and loved ones left behind. While hearts are grieving, practical matters must also be tended. The deceased likely owned property had some outstanding bills at the time of death. The court procedure for handling and wrapping up those affairs is called probate. Knowing how probate in Ohio works can help both the person administering the estate and the surviving loved ones follow and participate in the process.

Why is Choosing an OH Estate Planning Attorney Important?

We all want financial security--for ourselves and our loved ones. If something were to happen, we want to be sure that our spouse, children, or other dependents are provided for. In Ohio (OH), take steps to gain that security by creating a comprehensive estate plan with an experienced estate planning attorney. By doing so, you and your family will know that there is a workable plan in place for the security of your family.Estate planning is not limited to the management of your personal affairs after your death. It is also particularly important if you have substantial financial assets or operate a business. Coordinating succession planning for your business with your estate plan can help assure that your personal assets are distributed as you intend and that your business has the assets and direction it needs for its continuing operation or sale.By carefully choosing an OH estate planning attorney, you can be proactive in creating the best possible framework for the care and security of your loved ones and business interests after your passing.

Ohio Power of Attorney: The Basics

Chances are you've heard the term "power of attorney" at some point, probably in reference to health care decisions. Although that is one type of power of attorney, it isn't the only one. This article will touch on the different types of powers of attorney and focus on the Ohio power of attorney for financial affairs.

Using DAP Trusts in WV to Keep Heirlooms in Your Family

Grandmother's wedding ring holds deep sentimental value to the family. It also holds substantial financial value. This is an heirloom that you have been honored to have had passed down to you and one that you would like to keep in your family. A West Virginia DAP trust, or domestic asset protection trust, is a tool to help you do just that. DAP Trusts in WV can be used to protect valuable heirlooms such as jewelry, art, antiques, and other valuable property from financial distribution to creditors. The sentimental value of these items may far outweigh the financial value to you and your family. However, a creditor will only be interested in the financial value and may attempt to force a sale in order to garner funds owed to that creditor. Developing an estate planning asset protection strategy with an estate planning attorney in WV is the best way to proactively defend your family heirlooms from potential future creditors.

Deportation Estate Planning and Deportation Trusts in WV

Proposed changes in US immigration laws and policies raise questions for many about their legal status in the country. Various federal laws and policies address immigrant status, such as the Dream Act, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), and Temporary Protected Status (TPS). The uncertainty regarding potential changes in the law leads to uncertainty for non-citizens living and working in the US.Immigrants in West Virginia (WV) have created meaningful lives rooted in their residency, but the shifts in US immigration policy and laws create an imminent need for deportation estate planning to care for their local family. The estate planning tools available to them include the creation of deportation trusts in West Virginia (WV). An immigrant questioning his or her status in the US would benefit from learning how a deportation trust can help establish a solid plan to protect assets and provide for family should he or she be detained or deported.

Estate Planning for Same-Sex Couples in Kentucky

The Supreme Court of the United States ruled, in 2015, that all states must recognize same-sex marriage. This legal recognition of equal rights extended the privileges of marriage to those in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community. However, considerations for estate planning for same-sex couples in Kentucky remain important.

A Holographic Will in West Virginia: Why Caution is Required

Although it might sound like a three-dimensional image, a holographic will is simply a will that is completely handwritten and signed by the testator, the person leaving instructions on how his or her estate should be distributed at death. West Virginia and just over half of the remaining states recognize handwritten wills. But state law sets out specific requirements for a holographic will in West Virginia to be valid, and testators should use caution in choosing to leave direction to family and loved ones in this manner.

What If You Die with No Will in Kentucky?

People plan for many things--vacations, college, retirement. If an individual avoids end-of-life planning and passes away with no will in Kentucky, the Kentucky Revised Statutes (KRS) dictate that person's rightful heirs. Determining rightful heirs without a will can be complex because numerous Kentucky estate laws govern intestate succession in the state. If you believe you are entitled to inherit without a will in Kentucky--or if you want to avoid passing away without a will--it is wise to consult with an experienced Kentucky probate attorney.
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